Posts Tagged ‘social media’

GGDOttawa March 2015 Event – The Tales of Journalism: the good, the bad and the future

Riddle me this: who has two legs and chases politicians around Centre Block, types fast enough on a smart phone to live-tweet a committee meeting, has over 18K followers on Twitter, and spends their free time watching loads of Netflix?

Payton-CBCOn March 26, 2015, Girl Geek Dinners Ottawa uncovers the life of political journalist Laura Payton.

From Saskatchewan to Ottawa, to Vancouver then back to Ottawa, Laura’s journalistic adventures have taken her from crime and animal stories, to chasing politicians down hallways and covering some of the most prolific scandals and election shenanigans.

Known projects:

Abortion debate may come back in 2014 – January 2014

Robocalls immunity deal struck with ex-Tory worker – January 2014

Conservative campaign database fiasco costs party millions – October 2013

Since completing a master of journalism at Carleton University in 2007, Laura has spear-headed her career to become one of Ottawa’s prolific political journalists, as well as a social media influencer with over 18,000 followers on Twitter.

But, we can all agree success does not come without risks, setbacks or competition.

Join us for a candid presentation on a “day in the life of a Laura Payton,” her experiences and lessons learned as a woman in political journalism, the shifts of technology and social media in journalism, and how she became a key influencer on the Hill and online.

When: Thursday, March 26, 2015

Where: Maxwell’s Bistro (340 Elgin St. – private room upstairs)

Time: Doors open 5:30 PM | Presentation (including food order) 6 PM | Event ends 7 PM

Cost: $10 (does not include meals or drinks)

CLICK HERE to register.

Thank you to our community sponsor Ottawa Digital Marketing Meetup

Thank you to our door prize sponsors:

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canvaspop

Event Re-cap: The Art of Storytelling ft. Melanie Coulson

melanie coulsonWho said algorithms were only for computers! On January 29, 2015, Melanie Coulson delved into the magic algorithm of storytelling (Click here to view her presentation). As an award-winning journalist and currently United Way Ottawa’s Director of Communications and Content, Melanie is a wizard with words and her advice to Girl Geek Dinner Ottawa’s audience was to MAKE MAGIC!

The magic of storytelling is: compelling content = conversions ($$)

The algorithm for compelling content is: CC = UA + GS + D x S

Understand your audience (UA)

Create a bond with your audience. Know their voice and preferred channel of communication. Are you writing for women over age 60 who are retired and care about helping puppies and children in need? Or are you writing for a man in his mid-30s who is career-driven, lives a fast-paced life and doesn’t have children?

Tell a great story (GS)

A great story starts with a message then immediately hooks in the reader. Nowadays, digital audiences are fickle and have short attention span. Focus your energy on the lead which should be 25 words or less. The internet waters are full of fish so how is your message going to rise above the current. You should also find great characters. You might be thinking “but we sell hard drives, how can we create or find a character when we sell simple hard drives.” There’s most likely someone in your network who has experienced a devastating computer crash and lost all of their files and hard work. They then decided to purchase one of your hard drives and now feel secure and protected from future crashes. No matter how simple or diverse your product or campaign, map out all the potential story angles and find that character. And don’t forget about the setting; the atmosphere in which you want to tell your story. What emotion do you want readers or viewers to feel and how will the setting create that emotion.

Decide how to tell your story (D)

This is where direction and planning come into play. Create a content team. Declare a managing editor. Use tools such as an editorial calendar in an excel sheet or on a white board in the boardroom. Build a story around everything you do. Anything that your company does internally or in the community, create a story. Develop strong visuals such as photos or video. No stone left unturned.

Share your story (S)

Social media now gives storytellers more power than ever before. Share your story on every social network you can and ask for your community’s support. Use tools such as Storify and Buzzfeed. Use crowd sourcing as a way to generate stories with impact, a human touch. Make sure every story has a purpose, a call to action. Without this, readers won’t know what to do next or where to go.

In the spirit of storytelling, Melanie has reached out to the GGDOttawa community for their support for a mini-campaign to help sheltered girls aged 12-20 have access to wifi so they can search for jobs and look for permanent housing. Until February 28, we have an opportunity to make a difference in another girl’s life. Please click here to join the Bring Wifi to Evelyn House campaign.

Thank you to our event door prize sponsor CanvasPop and congratulations to our three winners.

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Join us for our next event Wednesday February 25, 2015 featuring Allison Malloy, Software Engineer at Kongsberg Gallium, who will present about drones used in commercial situations such as Amazon.com using drones to deliver packages, and agriculture, law enforcement, underwater exploration, as well as defence/military.

Event Recap: How to Measure Success in Social Media

Do you know how to gather the right data to help you achieve your business goals? Are you looking for new ways to measure social media success?

On November 26, Shawna Tregunna, founder of ReSoMe (Relevant Social Media), helped answer these questions and showed attendees how to maximize readily accessible data to measure success in social media activities.

When developing a measurement strategy, it’s important to answer what makes a great metric. Two factors should be considered: what type of measurement is relevant to the success of the business and does the measurement provide actionable insights.

Once you determine how to measure your social media data, next step is figuring out what you have to compare the data to in order for it to be purposeful for the business.

Shawna provided a great model explaining the marketing sales funnel and its customer touch points the buyer journey:

funnel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are four key metrics to help measure the success of your funnel:

  • Number of opportunities in your funnel and the rate at which you are acquiring these opportunities – or arrival rate.
  • The total possible value of every deal in your funnel or total funnel value.
  • Average amount of time prospects are in the sales funnel until they are acquired.
  • Average percentage of closes that your team effectively navigates through your funnel.

Shawna advises to not make the mistake of front-loading your sales funnel hoping that it will result in more sales. Take the “Groupon effect” as an example. Offering a truck load of special offers or discounts that attracts volume may not be viable if you don’t have a solid grasp on how your business is currently performing. The key is to making sure your prospects are qualified leads and you’re capable of nurturing them through the sales process and maximizing the impact points in which the leads encounter. Impact points represent the impact on the ability of your business to make money. Every impact point has the ability to make or lose money. For example, employees fall under Cost Centre, but by enabling and encouraging employees on social media, this is an opportunity to turn a cost into a profit.

Impact Points

Profit Centre Savings Centre Cost Centre
Acquisitions

Retention

Up-sell

Cross-sell

User-generated content

Referrals

Support Centre

Advertising

Employees

Another method to maximize social media data is integrating with your CRM (customer relationship module). By including customer social media information, you can tie online actions to specific clients within the sales process. Facebook ads also allow you to customize your target audience by email. If your clients email is associated with their Facebook profile, you can create targeted ads and messaging just for clients or prospects.

Shawna capped off the presentation with suggestions for free tools that can help you track and measure:

  • Analytics.twitter.com – shows interests of followers, location and influencers.
  • Klout – good tool to measure influencers. More than 30 or 40 Klout score represents good/notable standing.
  • Riffle – tells you which tools your competition is using, your ratio of posts (new posts, retweets and replies – are you just pushing content or engaging on a regular basis), and top hashtags.
  • Alexa – learn how your website is ranked via traffic, but ensure you understand your business goals to understand purpose of traffic. Can also provide you with competitive analysis. If social media is driving traffic to your website, what’s your activity compared to your competitors?
  • Moz link data – measures the quality of inbound links. For example, when you Google search cars in Ottawa, who ranks first? Google takes linking into consideration when ranking search results. How can social media help influence your ranking? Maximize influencers and audience engagement so they direct traffic to your website.

Click here to view Shawna’s presentation Accessible Metrics that Matter. You can also check out our hashtag feed to read what attendees shared and check out our event photos on Facebook.

Don’t forget to save the date! Our next Girl Geek Dinner Ottawa event will be January 29, 2015 featuring Melanie Coulson about how charitable giving is now hi-tech. Stay tuned for more details!

On behalf of the GGDOttawa Organizing Team, have a safe and happy holiday! 

How to Measure Success in Social Media: Magic of Data

Shawna TregunnaShawna Tregunna is the founder of ReSoMe (Relevant Social Media) a social media centric online marketing agency.  She specializes in community management and engagement outsourcing, content creation and creative design.  Her company’s specialized teams bring brands to life online.

Shawna’s goal is to help businesses and professionals successfully integrate social media into their marketing mix. She widely proclaims that the magic is in the data! She is a firm believer in trends, demographics, statistics and patterns, and with her research team, has developed systems and processes that use the data to find accessible target markets online.

Join us on Wednesday, November 26th as Shawna delves into the magic of data and shows our members how to maximize readily accessible data to measure success in social media activities.

Event details:

When: Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Where: Maxwell’s Bistro (340 Elgin St – upstairs)

Time: Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Event starts at 6:00 p.m. (including food order)

Event ends at 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $10.00 (does not include meals and drinks)

CLICK HERE to reserve your spot!

Thank you to our sponsor:

nac

 

 

January 15 Event: The Internet – Privacy, Identity, Reputation and You!

The internet is more and more a part of our everyday lives. Email, web browsing, location-based services, social media—these are all powerful tools for work and play, but they also offer unprecedented opportunity for abuse. Privacy law and best practices are evolving rapidly. On Wednesday, January 15th, we kick off the new year with privacy scholar Dr. Jennifer Barrigar (@jennbarrigar) as she discusses developments in online privacy — asking (and answering) some thought-provoking questions.

  • Did you know it would take (by recent estimates) 72 days per year to minimally review policy privacies/user agreements the average individual interacts with on an ongoing basis?
  • Do you know when/how/why/whether employers, insurance companies, governments have the right to use information you post on social media against you?
  • Is the “stupid user” to blame when their privacy is violated?

Bring your questions and concerns for a lively Q&A discussion!

Dr. Jennifer BarrigarDr. Jennifer Barrigar (LL.D, University of Ottawa) is a longtime scholar and writer on reputation as a means of surveilling and shaping people’s identities online, as well as the law’s treatment of reputation—online and off.  Dr. Barrigar has lectured and written on these issues for more than a decade, throughout the rapid evolution of social media and increasing online surveillance. For several years she served as Legal Counsel at Canada’s Privacy Commission where she participated in the initial application and interpretation of Canada’s 2001 private sector privacy act (PIPEDA) and international standards for privacy and data protection. She has also taught law courses at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University.  She holds an LL.M.degree from the University of Ottawa, an LL.B. from Dalhousie University, and an Honours B.A. from Carleton University. Learn more about Dr. Barrigar at http://reputableblog.org

 

Event details:

When: Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Where:  Johnny Farina Restaurant (216 Elgin Street)

Time: Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Event starts at 6:00 p.m. (including food order)

Event ends at 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $10.00 (does not include meals and drinks)

CLICK HERE to reserve your spot.

 

Thank you to our door prize sponsors!

nac

canvaspop

SugarLandMedia

Event Recap: Data for #MentalHealth, Nov. 20, 2013

1472099_368812726588188_1368693414_nOn November 20th, Girl Geek Dinners Ottawa wrapped up the 2013 season with guest speaker Shelley McKay. Shelley is a strategic consultant who is leading a pilot project that will use social media, analytics and predictive models using keywords and phrases associated with known risk factors, to identify youth suicidal behaviours/ideations at the earliest possible point. Shelley launched this project after her daughter tried to take her own life and subsequently experienced first hand how fractured our health care system is when it comes to youth mental health.

What Shelley is proposing with her pilot project is to utilize existing government monitoring tools to monitor social media channels for our at-risk youth. The program, she explained, can process 85,000 word a minute. A minute!! And it’s able to place context to the key words being processed. Meaning, the program knows the difference between someone saying they are going to “bomb a city” and a comment such as “that show was the bomb!” In the context of monitoring our youth, the program can analyze their mood, track mood trends and language patterns so parents, schools and hospital can take a proactive care approach rather than a reactive one. This is the first goal of the project. The second goal, Shelley explains, is to reduce the pressure on our region’s emergency rooms by proactively identifying youth in crisis and directing them to appropriate treatment.

Now as a marketer, you might be asking how it is possible to monitor people with our current privacy laws. Attendees asked just that. This, of course, is one of the hurdles that Shelley is currently taking on. Partnered with SAS, a leading company in ‘big data’, Shelley and her team are working with our government, schools, hospitals, such as The Royal Ottawa, and health officials to make this project concept a reality.

If you’d like to learn more about Shelley’s project, give her a tweet: @McKayShelley.

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Thank you again to our door prize sponsors! 

canvaspop

nac

SugarLandMedia

BBBSO

GGD Ottawa presents: Data for Mental Health – November 20th

Shelley McKayOf the 6.7 million people who have a mental health problem, about one million are children and teenagers between nine and 19 years old. The high cost of treatment and care of teenagers with mental health concerns and the lack of available services is a serious problem in Canada. Emergency room visits often occur when youth are in a crisis state and outcomes for these youth are poor. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among Canadian youth. Suicide is influenced by social media as well as social and environmental factors.

Can social media data serve as an effective early warning system to help prevent such tragedies?

Join us on November 20th as strategic consultant Shelley McKay answers this question as she discusses the pilot project she is leading that will use social media, analytics and predictive models using keywords and phrases associated with known risk factors to identify suicidal behaviours/ideations at the earliest possible point. This project is a first in Canada and the outcome objective of the project is two-fold: proactive rather than reactive support for our youth and reduce the pressure on our region’s emergency rooms by proactively identifying youth in crisis and directing them to appropriate treatment.

Shelley is a strategic consultant living with PTSD, working to integrate mental health into National Health Strategy and to raise funds to deliver more mental health services.  She is a former Canadian National Team athlete and Woman of Distinction Award winner. Through keynote addresses and lobbying, Shelley shares her personal experiences and challenges in an effort to inform the public, media, employers, government and healthcare communities about the urgent need to build a more coordinated national healthcare strategy by including initiatives and strategies to meet the needs of people impacted by mental illness.

Event details:

When: Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Where:  SideDoor (18 York Street) NOTE NEW LOCATION

Time: Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Event starts at 6:00 p.m. (including food order)

Event ends at 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $10.00 (does not include meals and drinks)

CLICK HERE to reserve your spot for Wednesday, November 20th. We hope to see you!

 

Thank you to our door prize sponsors!

nac

 

canvaspop

SugarLandMedia

BBBSO

Open Data Event Recap

From mobile apps to social media technology and from open data to public policy, women are continually influencing the way information is being shared across the world.

On March 30, three women taught us that technology isn’t just an objective, it changes society and infrastructure as a whole.

Mary Beth Baker, Emily Daniels and Tracey Lauriault, were part of a technological revolution known as Open Data Ottawa. A few months back, they organized Hackfest, an opportunity for technology lovers to come together to create unique and innovative mobile apps with the purpose of helping Ottawa citizens to enjoy and easily access recreation and services the city has to offer.

Thanks to our wonderful speakers and guests, the event generated huge awareness on Twitter.  We highly encourage participation from everyone, male or female, and if you know someone that’s passionate about technology or has an idea for an event, please don’t hesitate to talk to us, we love questions and feedback!

What can we take away from this event? From creative ideas for new apps to learning resources you can take home with you,  Mary Beth, Tracey and Emily enlightened us with their passion for the pursuit of open data :

  • If you’re not reading this, make sure to pick up The Real World of Technology by Ursula Franklin and also check out Datalibre.ca.
  • Remember Erin Brockovich? Well, she’s back in the spotlight and working on passing an open data bill about disease clusters being mapped and made public. Does this mean a sequel?!
  • Another great quote is from the lovely Jane Jacobs, “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”
  • If you loved the past Hackfest and want to take part again, Mary Beth is hoping to start a Mother’s Day Hackfest in May. Feel free to contact her for more information, maribethbaker <at> gmail.com. You can also check out photos from the last Hackfest on behalf of Edward  Ocampo-Gooding.
  • And last, but not least, open data is not about sharing personal information with the public.  In order to share public information we have the right to know and to answer public policy issues that affect us and our communities.

Thanks again to our sponsors for their continued support.  We hope all the door prize winners enjoy their prizes!

CIRA .CA

Thornley Fallis

Open Data Ottawa

The Lemon Kitchen

Media Miser

The National Arts Centre

Swing Dynamite